Accessibility

Our Commitment to Access, Equity, and Inclusion
This page is currently under construction!

UConn Education Abroad is committed to making education abroad accessible to all UConn students regardless of an individual’s race, color, ethnicity, religious creed, age, sex, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, veteran’s status, gender identity or expression, or membership in any other protected classes. A student is likely to encounter an array of attitudes and responses regarding access, equity and inclusion issues while abroad. For more information, please visit DiversityAbroad.com’s Guide to Diversity and Inclusion Abroad.

Tips for Getting Started:

  • Begin the advising process early on to allow for preparation time
  • Register with the Center for Students with Disabilities if you are not already
  • Disclose your condition to an education abroad advisor to help navigate the process
  • Consider the accommodations needed for activities of daily living, while on an airplane,
    participating in academics, housing and excursions
  • Consider any medications or medical equipment for which you will need access when abroad
  • Determine what types of medical care you will need while abroad
  • Contact the Center for Students with Disabilities to discuss your participation in education abroad
  • Learn about the technology available to assist people with chronic illnesses to travel

Resources:

Getting Over Your Fears: A Guide to Studying Abroad with a Chronic Illness
How to Study Abroad While Coping with a Chronic Illness
Managing Mental Health While Abroad

Meaningful Travel: Tips and Tales, Health & Chronic Illness Abroad
Mental Health Wellness Abroad
MIUSA
Studying Abroad with a Chronic Illness or Disability
Studying Abroad with Chronic Illness: Don’t Let it Stop You
Unpacked: Why I Chose to Study Abroad Despite my Mental Illness

 

Scholarships:
FastWeb
TopUniversities
NITRO

 

Tips for Getting Started

  • Work with an International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) advisor to determine the immigration requirements for your U.S. student visa
  • Work with an academic advisor to determine the requirements of your degree (both majors and minors), as well any impact to your intended graduation date
  • Research the visa requirements for the program-country based on your citizenship
  • Consider your timelines for studying abroad, including any plans for return trips to your home country (or travel outside the U.S.), while processing your documents for the education abroad program. This includes the UConn application period, the program specific application, any visa related appointments, and the process period until your visa/passport is available.

Resources:
Plan for Study Abroad as an International Student in the U.S.
U.S. State Department 

Scholarships:
International Student Scholarships 

 

UConn Education Abroad is committed to facilitating access to every student interested in going abroad. Accordingly, the department works closely with the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) to accommodate students with disabilities. To explore whether a program may allow for accommodations, first meet with your Education Abroad Advisor. UConn cannot guarantee that any program will offer the accommodations needed, but will provide students with the information available to make the best decision on program selection. Second, please contact the Center for Students with Disabilities, which will, in turn, get in touch with Education Abroad to coordinate efforts. Once a student is accepted, the student will be prompted to complete a Student Accommodation Request Form. A student may open and complete a request form at any time.

Tips for Getting Started

  • Begin the advising process early to allow time to prepare for your education abroad program
  • Disclose your status to an education abroad advisor (early on) who can help navigate your plans
  • Consider the accommodations you will need for activities of daily living, while on an airplane, academics, housing and excursions
  • Contact the Center for Students with Disabilities to discuss your interest in education abroad
  • Learn about the latest technology resources available to assist people with disabilities to travel

Resources

AWAY Journal Follows Students with Disabilities Abroad and Back

MIUSA’s latest issue of A World Awaits You (AWAY) introduces eight U.S. college and university students with disabilities and their strategies for successfully studying abroad in countries ranging from Israel to China to Uganda. It also includes a guide to ten study abroad scholarships that encourage diversity so that more students can take the plunge! Read the fully-accessible online publication here.
Link: http://www.miusa.org/resource/booksjournals/awaystudyabroad

MIUSA Podcast Makes Waves

What do people with disabilities set in motion when they travel for international exchange? To find out, tune in to MIUSA’s Ripple Effects podcast! Every episode contains vivid accounts of how travelers with disabilities abroad are shifting ideas of what is possible. In support of the #BlindAbroad campaign, the first series of guests are blind or low vision exchange alumni from the U.S. and abroad. Play the first two episodes online, and subscribe on iTunes!
Link: http://www.miusa.org/resource/podcast/rippleeffects

Videos Encourage People with Disabilities to Go Abroad!

International opportunities through study or volunteering abroad can have far-reaching benefits. In the  “Passport to Possibilities” videos, people with disabilities share their experiences going abroad, including their tips for funding travel and getting around in a foreign country. Also learn how the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange (NCDE), a project of MIUSA and the U.S. Department of State, can help with preparations. Captions provided.
Link: http://www.miusa.org/news/2015/passportvideo

Scholarship Information

As a first generation student, just coming to UConn may have seemed out of reach at some point, not to mention the thought of going abroad. That said, there are many resources available to assist students interested in this opportunity of a lifetime. Some programs are designed specifically for Student Support Services (SSS) students, but there are many more program options, and selection can seem overwhelming. Meet with an Education Abroad Advisor to discuss your questions and concerns and to learn more about the benefits of a study abroad experience. Education Abroad and SSS are here to help you with every step of this journey!

Tips for Getting Started: Questions to discuss with an Education Abroad Advisor

  • If no one in my family has ever gone on a program abroad, who can help me check to see that I am on the right track as I plan?
  • Is it okay if I schedule an extra appointment with my study abroad advisor if I’m not sure what to do?
  • How do I talk to my family and friends about study abroad?
  • What resources are available to me?
  • How will I make education abroad affordable?
  • Are there additional funding sources I can look into to help finance a program?
  • How does financial aid work with education abroad?
  • How do I obtain a passport?
  • How do I know if I need a visa?
  • What precautions should I be aware of before going abroad?
  • Do I need any vaccinations?

Resources

Scholarships

*Please let your Education Abroad Advisor know if you plan to apply for the Benjamin Gilman, Boren or Critical Language Scholarship prior to submitting the application. You will be referred to a contact in the UConn National Scholarships and Fellowships office for support with the application process and documentation will be provided on your behalf from Education Abroad to complete the requirements.

Some countries are very open and accepting of LGTBQIA+ people, but others are not and could put students in a hostile situation or even put their safety at risk. Students should become informed by researching the attitudes, customs and laws in the country they are considering.

Questions for LGTBQIA+ Students to Consider (developed by UMass Amherst, The Stonewall Center and CISabroad)

About You:
• How open will I be about my sexual orientation and gender identity with my teachers, peers, friends, host family and others?
• How important is it to me to find other LGBTQIA+ students and friends while abroad? How will I make connections with other LGBTQIA+ students, local residents or community organizations? What are my expectations about seeking and finding community?
• Will I need access to any medications, supplies, or services due to my transgender status? Are they available in my host country? If not, will I need any additional documentation to travel with my medication or supplies?
• What are my safety needs and perceptions and how can they best be met? Is the program able to make accommodations for students who request single rooms, private baths or specific roommates?
• What resources are available in my host country for LGBTQIA+ people?
• Are there any LGBTQIA+ friendly establishments nearby? How can I find them?

About the Culture of Your Host Country:
• What are the cultural attitudes toward sexual orientation and gender identity in my host country?
• What are considered typical male and female social behavior and customary gender relations and social patterns in the host country?
• What may make the coming out process different in the host country compared to the U.S.?
• What are the norms and behavioral expectations within LGBTQIA+ communities in my host country?
• What is the social perception of LGBTQIA+ people in my host country? How are LGBTQIA+ people socially defined? What roles do they have in the host culture?

About Your Host Country’s Laws:
• Are there “public indecency/decency” laws? Or any laws that criminalize same-sex sexual relationships, or ways men and women socially interact?
• What is the age of consent? Does it differ for heterosexual versus same-sex couples?
• Does the law require having “proper documentation” at all times?
• What is the general police attitude toward the local LGBTQIA+ community?
• Is the law applied the same in rural areas as in urban areas?

About Perceptions of People from the U.S. and LGBTQIA+ People:
• What is the attitude of local residents toward people from the U.S., people of other nationalities, “tourists,” and LGBTQIA+ “tourists”?
• What is the general police attitude towards the same as above?
• What is the general police attitude toward LGBTQIA+ people who are visiting the country?

Resources:

Scholarships

 

Tips for Getting Started:
Questions to consider and discuss with an Education Abroad Advisor

  • Consider what time of the year would be most feasible for you to participate in study abroad
  • Determine if a full semester or short-term program would be most realistic
  • Talk with your support system about your interest in education abroad
  • Discuss your goals as well as your perceived barriers with an education abroad advisor (financial, employment, family responsibilities, community commitments, etc.)
  • Meet with your academic advisor to factor in your degree requirements (majors and minors) as well as your intended graduation date
  • Strategize your selected program to meet your career goals, both in the short and long-term, while considering language acquisition, networking, internship opportunities and service learning
  • Ask what the current participation in your program of interest looks like. Are there other non-traditional students participating? Are there any who have previously participated?

Scholarships:
College Scholarships
FastWeb

Tips for Getting Started:
Questions to consider and discuss with an Education Abroad Advisor

  • Where do people of my race/ethnicity fit into my host country’s society?
  • Am I likely to be a target of racism/classism?
  • What are the similarities with how I am treated in the U.S.?
  • What are the cultural norms of my host country?
  • Are there religious/cultural institutions or rituals adhered to?
  • What is the history of ethnic or racial tension in the country? Is the situation currently hostile to members of a minority race, majority race, or particular ethnicity or religion?
  • Are issues of racism/ethnic discrimination influenced by immigration in my host country? How do politicized immigration concerns fuel racial tensions? What is the character of immigrant communities?
  • Are there laws in the host country governing race relations? Ethnic relations?
  • What does participation look like for UConn students currently?
  • How can I speak with other UConn students about their experiences as racial/ethnic minorities?

 

Diversity Abroad, Racial and Ethnic Minority Student Guide

Go Overseas, What to Know About Studying Abroad as a Minority

Scholarships:
African American Scholarship.com
>API
Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship
Black Excel
Diversity Abroad
Fund for Education Abroad
Hispanic Scholarship Fund
IES: David Porter Need-Based Scholarship
Korean American Scholarship Foundation
National Action Council for Minorities in EducationScholarships.com

 

Tips for Getting Started:
Questions to consider and discuss with an Education Abroad Advisor
  • What do I know about the religion(s) of my host country and the role religion plays in society?
  • What is the attitude of people in my host country towards other religions?
  • How are religious holidays observed and celebrated? Will I want to participate?
  • How will people perceive my religion? Is my religion legal in my host country?
  • Will I have access to my religion’s places of worship or religious groups? If not, how will I adjust my religious practice while abroad?
  • Will my religion’s holidays be observed and celebrated in my host country? If not, how will I plan to observe holidays?
  • Will my religious dietary restrictions be accommodated in my host country?
  • If I plan to live in a homestay while abroad, am I open to living in a homestay with a similar or diverse religious background from myself?
Resources:
Scholarships:

Tips for Getting Started:
Questions to Consider and Discuss with an Education Abroad Advisor:

  • How will my military benefits be impacted by the costs of participating in education abroad?
  • Should I meet with the UConn Veterans Affairs and Military Programs office?
  • How do my previous international travel experiences impact my program selection?
  • How do my previous cross-cultural experiences impact my current academic interests?
  • How might an education abroad experience help prepare me for my future career?
  • What academic courses might intersect with my personal experiences, regional interests, career interests and fulfill my academic needs?
  • Are there unique supports for veterans on education abroad programs?